Fender Blackout Strat Becomes Even More Classic(al)

The original neck on this MIM Black Strat was made from wood that tended to twist when the string tension varied, either because of temperature changes or when employing different string gauges. It’s now time to take this guitar to the next level, and make it an iconic Blackout Strat

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The neck will be retired to another instrument.

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This instrument was built in 2006, which happened to be the 60th anniversary of the founding of Fender Corporation.

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The neck is off and headed to its new home.

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David Gilmour’s Blackout Strat has a maple fret board. This instrument will get a new maple neck, with a 59 ‘C’ contour and an almost 2 inch wide nut. With light strings, this guitar will feel like a nylon-stringed classical guitar.

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The aftermarket Fender tuners are lined up with the machinist’s rule and tightened into place one by one.

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These tuners are ‘locking’ tuners, which positively grip the end of each string in a clamp. This is necessary on this instrument because of the very light gauge strings we will be using.

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Head stock and nut are ready to go.

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The middle pickup appears to be not working. Let’s take a look inside.

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Sure enough, there is a broken wire inside the pickup cover.

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The break in the wire is literally in the very last turn! So one turn is un-spooled and threaded through the eyelet where it belongs.

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As was done at the factory, the wire end is pulled through the eyelet a few times and soldered in place.

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The middle pickup is tested and is right where it should be.

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The Classic(al) Blackout Strat is strung with 7 gauge strings; Yes, not 12s, not 10s, but with Billy Gibbon’s own Dunlop Reverend Willy Extra Light Electric Guitar Strings, .007-.038. With the proper setup, this instrument has the play-ability and feel of a nylon-strung classical guitar. Thus, we have the Classic(al) Blackout Strat.

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Thanks for reading all the way to the bottom!

CONTACT – David Latchaw EE
281-636-8626

Squire Jagmaster Gets a Total Make-over And Then Some! Part Two of Four

In our first installment of this project, The Unbrokenstring Crew installed some new pickups in this cool offset-waist Jagmaster. Now, The Unbrokenstring Crew takes a deep breath. The inserts for the Tune-O-Matic will fall right at the edge of the body route for the Fender tremolo block. Extensive modification of the body is necessary for the next steps.

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So The Unbrokenstring Crew takes an inspiration break. The first Fender-style guitar we’d seen with a Tune-O-Matic bridge was Larry Carlton’s Valley Arts ‘Strat’ copy, seen at about 9:10 in this video from 2012. WARNING: lots of funny Guitar Face to be seen throughout the video.

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To position the TOM (Tune-O-Matic) bridge, we need to verify the dimensions of the guitar.

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The twelfth fret is just to the right of the fret board marker. If you double that measurement, you get the ‘scale length’ of the guitar.

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This metal machinist scale is eighteen inches long, so to complete the measurement to the bridge, we moved the end of the scale to the twelfth fret.

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You will see that the existing bridge saddle blocks fall around the same place on the machinist scale. This looks good so far.

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It’s time to get serious. The patient is prepped for major surgery. The black wire seen in the picture is the spring claw ground and the ground wire for the pickups.

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The claw is coming loose and the springs will be removed.

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After the new bridge and tremolo are installed, we won’t be needing this claw anymore.

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With the spring tension gone, the original bridge just falls out. These inserts, though, should be tight, and they are not.

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Both of the inserts had broken out. This points to the main concern with this modification e.g. how to install new inserts for the TOM bridge, in the right place, with enough wood around them to assure mechanical stability and sustain. This was a significant question in the planning stages of this project.

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With the pick guard assembly temporarily in place, we can begin to establish the geometry of the new parts.

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The outline of the pick guard is lightly traced on the surface finish of the instrument. The starting (and ending) finish is matte black. This gives us considerable flexibility when doing the modifications and refinishing the instrument when modifications are finished.

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Some tape holds the machinist scale in place, leaving our hands free to do some marking down on the body.

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The TOM bridge will go about here. Guitar Cognoscenti advised that the TOM bridge should go about 8/64ths of an inch beyond the 1x Scale Length for the instrument, because of the increased string length which occurs when the string is deflected when fretted, and other effects. Thus, the mark for the center line of the TOM bridge is at the 12 and 56/64ths point under the machinist scale.

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The measurement made in the previous picture is expanded across the battle space so that the TOM inserts can be properly placed. Do you see the issue with the new TOM bridge placement?

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While we have the 24 inch artist’s scale out, let’s check to see what sort of clearance we have under the plane of the fret board to verify that the TOM bridge will fit. If it doesn’t fit, we can shim the neck up a bit and create more clearance.

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The exposed end of the ruler gives us an idea of where we are on bridge and neck geometry. This number goes into the notebook for later. Oh, and we have both English and metric systems well-represented here.

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Let’s move to the other axis, and establish the actual center line of the guitar. A string is fastened at the nut between the D and G slots.

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The position of the neck is the determining factor of where the bridge shall be, not necessarily the guitar body; There will be room for adjustment later if we need it, but let’s get it right while we’re here.

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The center of the bridge is marked on the tape.

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Before we go any farther, the original bridge is placed back on the body as a sanity check for the work done so far. As if sanity had any meaning at this point…

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Another number to go into the notebook is the original string width at the bridge. As we planned, the TOM bridge string spacing is really close to this measurement.

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The breakout from the original bridge inserts need to be addressed, because we really want as much solid material in this area as we can get.

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Both inserts broke the body out. Some instruments are best repaired by just router-ing out the entire top and substituting a slab of maple. However, with the routes on the back side, nothing would be left of this guitar body.

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These chips will be glued back where they belong, using hide glue. We avoided using a water-based adhesive such as Tite-Bond because the wood would swell from the water, then gradually shrink again over the next few months, rendering our efforts to fill all the cavities moot.

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This damage is repaired well enough to support the steps to follow.

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Birch is the less-beautiful cousin of maple. It has very little figure, and is very straight-grained. These birch dowels are perfect for filling the original holes where the inserts were installed.

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After adding some protective tape, the dowels are cut flush with this Japanese saw.

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I like this saw. So you are going to see lots of pictures of it today.

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I think you get the idea now. Yes, I like this saw!

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The blue strip that you see is the edge of the blue masking tape seen above. Note how close the edge of the routes are to the center line of the new bridge. All this needs to be filled-in so that the new inserts can be secure.

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We will work on this side for awhile. The neck is off and is out of the way.

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Much of the paint in the interior of this body is conductive shielding paint. Paint is not a good surface to glue anything to, so the Dremel tool and a sanding drum removes it all. This body is actually some very nice wood!

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Paint is removed all the way around the tremolo block route. No electronics will go down here, so I’m not worried about shielding.

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The tiny lip remains at the bottom of this route. This lip is actually on the front face of the body of the guitar. The Unbrokenstring Crew will leave it in place as a depth guide when installing the filler blocks.

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Since the neck was off, we took a moment to clean up the bottom of the neck pocket. A clean, hard neck pocket is essential for good guitar tone and sustain, as it forms the counter-spring for the strings themselves.

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Only the bottom was scraped, and then only enough to remove any soft, crumbly finish. The sides remain unmolested as they establish the geometry of the guitar, which we documented earlier.

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Two blocks will be fabricated to fill the trem block route. The paper patterns are on the left, and the block of spruce plywood is marked with the approximate shape to fit the route.

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These blocks are fitted to the original trem block route.

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The faces are cleaned up just enough to allow the glue to do its job when these are installed.

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These will stack into the body route. Do you see the little strip of glitter to the left of the spring route? That’s the original color of this guitar. Can you say “Glam”?

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We were able to source this NOS bridge from a company that purchases broken guitars from Big Box Retailers and separates the brand new parts from the firewood.

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This is the first meeting between the new bridge and the guitar body.

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This brad-point wood bit makes a good center-finder. This bit is exactly the same diameter as the inside diameter of the stud hole in the new bridge. Everything is arranged so that the point falls on the center line drawn on the blue tape.

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A shallow marking hole is then drilled to mark the spot.

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This picture clearly shows the issue with adding a TOM bridge to a Squire body. There is no substantial wood around the hole where the inserts will be installed. Yet, we press on!

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One last trial fit is performed for these filler blocks.

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These plugs are ready to go.

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These are a good, tight fit into the original trem route. Can you see the glitter?

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The top side should be flush. The lip inside the route was left behind to align the plugs already in the body. Another piece of birch will fill this shallow cavity.

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This little bit of solid birch is fitted to the opening.

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Hide glue is applied liberally and the stack of filler blocks are glued into place.

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With the glue dry, we are ready to keep moving on this project.

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The top is masked off again so that the top of this filler block can be completely level with the rest of the guitar.

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A cabinet scraper brings the top of the filler block down to the level of the top of the guitar, or at least to the same level as the masking tape.

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We cheated and used some wood filler to close up all the gaps. This will be finish sanded after one more coat of filler.

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For additional internal strength and rigidity, another block is fabricated to fill a bit more of the spring body route. The same birch plywood is pressed into service.

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The new filler block is a very tight fit. The paint around it will be sanded away so that the glue around the block can bond directly to the wood of the guitar body.

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This new filler block is now glued into place. You can see a layer of hide glue on the filler blocks already in place in the trem block route.

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The matte black finish was matched, leaving only the pilot holes for the new TOM inserts. All of the remaining body routes will be foiled and grounded at the output jack. We are covering some interesting shapes today!

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The pickup cavities are done.

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The control cavities are completed. The copper looks spectacular against the matte black of the body of the guitar. Here you can see how the matte black finish came out over the unfinished filler blocks installed previously.

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While we’re at it, let’s do the underside of the pick guard. Note that the seams of the tape are tack soldered. The seams inside the body are also tack soldered, to form a continuous shield.

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A small tab of foil extends from the body routes so that the foil under the pick guard can be bonded together using a pick guard screw for compression.

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Next, the holes for the inserts will be bored using this brad-point bit.

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The tape marks the correct depth. We don’t want to drill all the way through the guitar, do we?

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I couldn’t help myself. I had to place the new bridge where it goes just to gratify my curiosity.

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And while I’m gratifying myself, let’s check the position of the Bigsby.

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As we begin slowly boring the holes for the inserts, we can clearly see the boundary where the body ends (on the left) and the filler blocks begin (on the right.) This is one spot where we need the most strength and rigidity for best tone (and to keep the guitar from falling apart under string pressure.)

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This aircraft drill bit is boring a passage for the ground wire that will engage the bridge insert. To the left of the picture is another dowel rod.

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That distant dowel is in a hole on which the Bigsby is mounted. Using the eighteen inch long aircraft drill, we need to slant drill our way through the guitar body and hit that hole. Somehow.

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More blue tape indicates just how far I must drill through the body. If I don’t hit the dowel by the time the tape hits the copper, I missed.

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Inhale. Exhale. I hit it! Some wire left over from the spring claw is pushed through the holes drilled in the previous pictures. Yes, that wire made a ninety degree turn inside the body of the guitar. Kind of a big deal.

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Using the Exacto Knife, the insulation on the wire is nicked in the proper spot so that the insulation can be removed, allowing the wire to touch the bridge insert, thus grounding it.

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The insulation is removed so that the wire can form a compression joint with one of the bridge inserts, thus grounding the bridge.

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The big clamp can apply plenty of force to seat the bridge insert. The one on the far side has already been pressed into place.

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The ground wire is now joined with the wire from the pick guard shield and soldered to the foil in the control route.

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The free end of the ground wire is stripped and ready to be compressed against one of the Bigsby mounting screws.

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When the Bigsby is installed, the screw that goes here will compress the ground wire and make the electrical connection, thus grounding the Bigsby tremolo and strings. No wiring will be visible from the outside of the guitar.

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Here is the newly-installed bridge and trem. The pick guard is placed temporarily for this picture. This project is shaping up well!

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The Correct pick guard screws are now in hand and will replace the larger screws originally used on this guitar. The holes are partially filled with birch dowels and cut flush.

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The exact center of each pick guard screw hole is established with this pocket drill bit.

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Once the center is established, the hole can be bored using the Correct bit.

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This was a goof. The outside of one of the TOM bridge inserts interfered with this corner of the pick guard. The drum sander on the Dremel tool corrected the oversight.

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Here, we are finishing up with the pocket drill. I use the electric screw driver as a drill because it is slow and easy to control.

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This is a good shot that shows the modification of the pick guard to fit the TOM bridge insert.

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To assure that the studs fit snugly in the inserts, some copper foil is used as a shim over the threads of each stud to make electrical contact and to help lock the stud in place after adjustments are made.

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Copper foil is added or removed until the stud fits snugly regardless of how much of the stud is threaded into the insert.

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Little bits of copper foil are all it takes to get these studs shimmed up where they belong!

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It’s time to string it up!

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It’s a lot easier to get the strings on a guitar with a Bigsby if the ends are pre-formed to wrap around the roller.

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TOM bridges are versatile insofar as the saddles can be removed and turned around to extend their adjustability. Note: do not lose these little clips. Don’t ask me how I know this.

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Once the clip is off, the adjustment screw can be unthreaded from the saddle.

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The bevel on the top of the block can go either direction. We can use this to our advantage when setting intonation.

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This saddle has been turned around.

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The screw keeps the saddle in place.

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And the little clip keeps the screw in place. Again, don’t lose these.

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We took a detour to de-burr the hole in this tuning machine. This tuning machine was masquerading as a string cutter. The Unbrokenstring Crew will not tolerate broken strings!

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Step Two is complete. This guitar is a lot of fun!

In the third installment of this saga, The Unbrokenstring Crew will install a cut-out switch in this instrument, which silences the guitar whenever the switch is activated. However, this switch is not just a normal push button. Tune In next week for Episode Three!

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Thanks for reading all the way to the bottom!

CONTACT – David Latchaw EE
281-636-8626

New Luna Ukulele Is Bent Out Of Shape

Sophie’s aunt wanted to do something to further her niece’s continuing education and eventual career in music therapy.  This nice Luna ukulele was a thoughtful gift.  Unfortunately, there were many dead notes.  Could the Unbrokenstring Crew bring those notes back to life?

Inside the bag is a ukulele, some picks, a tuner, and an instructional DVD!

 

The words for “Peace” in forty-four languages are engraved into the soundboard of this instrument. All you hippies will recognize the peace sign in the sound hole.

 

Sure enough, there are several notes on the fret board, near the nut, that are muted out.

 

Name, rank, and serial number, please.

 

I am not sure what this number is…

 

The fret rocker shows a very tiny difference in fret height, when checking between adjacent frets.

 

However, a straight edge reveals that the neck is back-bowed. The tape just keeps the machinist’s scale upright so I could take the picture.

 

I recorded the string height for all posterity. This is not far from right for a ukulele. Some authorities say it’s too high, others say too low. Whatever.

 

The fret wire height is not adequate to support a fret level job. The back bow is just too much. Yes, the back bow is more than 0.040 inch on each end of the fret board!

 

My guess is, the fret board will need to be reshaped. Here, I’m recording the width of the fret wires.

 

Concert ukuleles are tuned A – E – C – G, with the bottom string, sometimes called String 1, the highest pitch. This G string diameter is about 0.022 inch.

 

The C string is about 0.030 inch.

 

The E string is the largest, measuring about 0.035 inch.

 

The drone string is tuned to A above the G. This string measures about 0.025 inch.

 

Interestingly, the fret board has about a 20 inch radius, while the nut and saddle are absolutely flat. The Luna Guitars Web site specs this instrument with a flat fret board, too. I’ve decided to re-flatten the entire fret board. The nut must come off. Here, I’m cutting the finish so that the nut can be removed cleanly.

 

I love whacking musical instruments with a hammer. I find it strangely satisfying.

 

The saddle slips out of its slot. You can see that there is no radius in the saddle at all.

 

The Smoking Gun. There is not enough string tension in the world to straighten this neck. It also has a twist. It doesn’t matter that this instrument has no truss rod because it wouldn’t help.

 

Visually, we can see the wavy fret board and a clear radius. How did this instrument leave the factory?

 

Let’s get the tuners out of the way.

 

I made this fret remover from an inexpensive set of end nippers from Harbor Freight.

 

These frets over the body are easily removed.

 

Before the woodworking begins in earnest, let’s tape everything off.

 

Some cardboard protects the entire soundboard.

 

The strategy is to flatten the fret board on the belt sander.

 

This little belt sanding station came from Harbor Freight.

 

Some of the safety covers were removed to enable the instrument to set flat on the sanding belt. Do not attempt this at home, kids!

 

The eighty-grit sanding belt begins to make an impression on the fret board. This fret board appears to be rosewood, but the Web site says that this instrument is all mahogany. Dunno about that.

 

With a twist that bad, we can easily inspect our progress.

 

Now I am wondering what I got myself into.

 

Back to it! Many thanks to my wife Glenda for taking these pictures.

 

Serious amounts of sanding dust are produced, so we are outside today.

 

Another check shows that we are not there yet.

 

The sanding belt is doing its work.

 

What is it going to take to get this straight?

 

Sanding dust is going everywhere. No scorch marks yet!

 

I am pleased that the fret markers are still intact.

 

Very light pressure is used now to clean up the surface.

 

Now we’re getting somewhere.

 

Continuing on, producing sanding dust like crazy.

 

Now I’m thinking that I need to be careful not to go too far.

 

Most of the fret board is flat. There is still some fall-away over the body of the ukulele, which is OK with me.

 

Last few strokes on the belt.

 

The twist is gone and most of the fret board is absolutely flat. I thought that the noise of sanding would drive the cats away, but we see Jack on the bottom step in the lower left corner of this picture.

 

The luthier’s scraper shows that the fret board is flat.

 

The sharp scraper is an excellent tool to finish raw wood.

 

The fret slots at fret six and seven are almost gone. I really don’t think that this fret board is mahogany.

 

Fret slot ten is almost gone.

 

One end of the fret slots over the body IS gone. Yes, it was that bad.

 

My fret saw was set to 0.054 inch, which is the depth of the new fret tangs.

 

Every slot was taken down to about 0.055 inch.

 

These short sections of small fret wire are perfect for this instrument.

 

Each fret was installed, and nipped to length after installation. The long ends were the pieces at the end of the short strips that weren’t long enough to fill another fret. They get nipped off separately.

 

After nipping, this file embedded in a block of nylon files the fret ends 90 degrees to the fret board. Moving the file to another slot allows the fret crowns to be filed to a 60 degree angle to the fret board. I love eBay!

 

Checking for flatness, these frets are ABSOLUTELY flat, which is not surprising.

 

The fret ends are shaped and burnished by hand, and the fret wires are lightly sanded. As with a classical guitar, the frets are not polished, but finely sanded in the same direction as that of the string.

 

The original nut was reused, and re-slotted to restore the original 0.060 inch string height. The nut was just right as it was. The fret board was oiled. New strings complete the job. All the notes are present and accounted for!

Thanks for reading all the way to the end!

CONTACT – David Latchaw EE

281-636-8626

Warmoth FrankenCaster: It Lives!

This offset-waist project guitar is playable and is actually very cool.  The owner had ‘gotten in over his head’ and broken a few screws and buggered a few others.  Could the Unbrokenstring Crew whip this instrument into shape again?

The easy part is to install gold Gibson speed knobs on the controls.  There are a lot of good parts in this instrument.

 

Looking more closely, the neck pocket will need some serious attention.  What’s going on here?

 

This is what’s going on.  If you look at the high and low strings, you will see that they are not the same distance from the edge of the fret board.  This neck is not lined up with the body of the guitar.

 

It is easy to remove the truss rod cover because these screw heads are already sheared off.

 

The heads of the screws around this pickup were mangled to the point that a regular Phillips screw driver would not engage them anymore.  Here we’re using a pair of cutters to twist the screw out while a magnet serves as a sentinel to keep pieces of metal that will inevitably shave off the screw head away from the magnet in the neck pickup.

 

Wow these are long.  These go most of the way through the body.

 

We are still working on this one.  This is really tough.

 

Note that the head is chewed up pretty badly.  New screws are already in stock.

 

No springs or tubing are underneath this pickup, bur rather a chunk of too-thick too-hard foam.

 

Now we know where this body came from!

 

And the neck is from Guitar Fetish.  Here, I marked where the body ends with a dotted line.  More on this later.

 

So what can we do about these broken screws?

 

No problems removing the tuners…  these screws were busted off as well.

 

To remove the broken screws, we apply heat to the body of the screw.  This dries out the surrounding wood so that it shrinks slightly.

 

I used the same technique with the wire cutters to grasp the body of the broken screw to twist it out easily.

 

Rinse and repeat for the remaining broken screws.

 

Now that everything is apart, I need to fix this neck pocket.  First, we get the bottom flat.

 

Then we get the sides flat.  This body was painted after it left the factory, so we have plenty of over-spray in the neck pocket that we need to clear out with this scraper.

 

I believe that we are down to real wood again.

 

Acoustic coupling occurs best when the neck and body fit tightly, ‘bone on bone,’ if possible.  I really like this wood hardener, which is essentially solid Lexan dissolved in a light solvent.

 

This raw wood will take a few coats to seal and harden.

 

As the old cowboy on the cattle drive once said, “Be sure to look back to see if the herd is still behind you.”  Periodic fit checks are always a good idea.

 

This neck is beautiful because of the thick layer(s) of polyurethane finish.  However, the polyurethane layer may get in the way of acoustically coupling the neck to the body.  Here, I’m hatching the area where I will scrape away finish.

 

Again, the luthiers’ scraper is the perfect tool for removing finish evenly and smoothly, leaving the surface exactly flat.

 

That is much better!  Not shown: the finish on the end and sides of the neck where it meets the body is also removed.

 

A pin vise holds the proper-sized twist drill to resize these holes for the Correct pickup screws.

 

A little canned air clears out the cuttings from the holes.

 

Over-sized screws held the pick guard in place.  The Correct screws are smaller.  Here, a small dowel is glued into each hole, which will be re-drilled with the proper-sized hole.  This is hide glue shown here; just fine for this duty.

 

Once the hide glue is cured, each dowel is trimmed flush.

 

I jumped ahead to show how the Correct screws are nearly flush with the top of the pick guard.  Almost factory.

 

This single-coil pickup reads as an open circuit.  That tiny wire is broken.

 

The tiny wire is broken because these black and white leads can twist around.  Hot-glue now holds them stationary.

 

The pickup is working now.  Here is some new, softer foam in place to hold the pickup in position.  Leo Fender would have used short pieces of vinyl tubing on the screws to act as a spring, but these covers go all the way to the bottom of the cavity route, so the foam is the best option for this setup.  Oh, and you can’t see it, but the copper pulled out when the original foam was replaced, so this guitar has copper in the pickup route and under the pick guard.

 

Here is the actual pickup.

 

And here is the separate cover.

 

The Correct screws are not nearly as hard to drive as the other screws.

 

More Guitar Fetish goodness!  The metal parts of the guitar should be tied to a single point, not at various places along the signal path.  This soldered wire ties the metal body of the pickup to one side of the audio path, and has got to go.

 

That connection is now cut open.

 

A separate layer of foil is wired to the single point ground.  The connection to the bridge and strings is accomplished with another sheet of foil and this outside-star lock washer.  Again, the mechanical ground is not part of the signal path.

 

Everything goes together as it should.  See how the star washer makes the connection between the bridge and foil?

 

The Correct controls are marked T for tone and V for volume.  The switch is ready to wire.

 

The new wiring is accomplished with solid wire in Teflon tubing.  The pickup wiring is the vintage ‘push-back’ wire, which is actually really easy to use and can be very clean-looking as the insulation is cut without resorting to wire strippers.

 

When the control plate is in the correct position, new holes are bored for the screws.

 

The neck plate needs some attention.  This metal polishing paste is also what I use to polish fret wire.

 

These holes are reamed to the proper size for the Correct screws.

 

The tuners are going on!  A bit of red felt is glued to the face of the socket so that the finish is not marred.

 

These new screws going into the correctly-sized holes are very well-behaved now.

 

The truss rod cover screws will now live in properly-sized holes as well.  The pin vise is getting a workout today!

 

The customer uses these strings.  We need the guitar strung so that we can get the neck straight.

 

Note that the outside E strings are equidistant from the edge of the fret board.  The screws attaching the neck to the body are tightened at this point.

 

Now that the neck is properly positioned, we can finish the setup.  The truss rod is adjusted to make the neck perfectly straight.  Do you see the slip of paper next to fret 9?  It is used as a feeler to see that the ruler is in contact with the fret board all along the neck.  A piece of paper is about 0.0015 inch thick or so.  It is used to check for fit between every fret on the fret board.  Yes, that makes a difference!

 

This neck is brand new, and so the frets had never been leveled.  Just a tiny bit of sanding was all it took.

 

Here I am taking a measurement of fret wire height.  I need this shortly to file the nut slots.

 

Frets are polished.

 

Fret board is cleaned and conditioned with oil.

 

Here we are cutting the nut slots to depth (about 0.006 inch plus the fret wire height measurement made earlier.)

 

Once the nut slots are at the right depth, the rest of the nut is sanded away to make the slots shallow.  We need to sand a little bit more away near the high E and B strings, and maybe next to the D string.  We’re getting there!

 

The instrument is back together and sounding good!

 

This is a closeup of the saddle barrels.  These are factory intonated and are VERY close to correct.  How do they do that?

 

Our patient is making her debut at the studio.

 

First Note.

 

I think he likes it!

Thanks for reading all the way to the end!

CONTACT – David Latchaw EE
281-636-8626