The Korean Squire ‘Blackout Strat’ Build

Matt’s unicorn was to again own a Blackout Strat like the one from his youth.  Could the Unbrokenstring Crew make an equal-or-better unicorn?
The body is a Korean Fender Strat with genuine wear.  The new neck is in superb shape.  This will be the basis for a cool project, particularly since modern parts are available to upgrade this guitar.

 

The neck comes off and will be updated separately.  Say ‘Goodbye’ to the Squire neck plate.

 

The dot inlays in this neck are really spectacular.

 

The pictures do not do justice to the spectacular mother of pearl in this fret board.

 

First, we’ll clean up a couple of handling skuffs that occurred while this project was coming together.

 

Tinted polyurethane, various grades of fine sandpaper, and a buff polish gets us back to where we belong.

 

A set of vintage tuners will be fitted to this head.  Here, we establishing the center line of the tuners.

 

Screws for the tuners will go where the scratches cross.

 

The pin vise is pressed into service to bore the screw holes.

 

This drill bit will be used as a gauge to verify the diameter of the tuner holes in the neck.

 

Sure enough, this neck was pre-drilled for 3/8ths inch bushings.

 

The bushings are fitted tightly into the neck.  This is essential for good tone, as the bushing supports the capstan, which is one end of the support structure that establishes string tension.  If these are loose, your strings won’t work very well.

 

Turning our attention to the body, we find that the ground wire was not properly soldered to the string claw.

 

The interior routes of the body were painted with a conductive paint.  This just won’t do for the Unbrokenstring crew.  This screw ties the conductive paint to the rest of the ground circuit.  We can do better.

 

The output jack is liberated from the stamped ‘football’ socket plate.  We will rework the wiring with heat shrink support in order to support the wires and make it more durable.  And the Unbrokenstring Crew will redo the soldering job, because We Own It if it fails.

 

The neck pocket must be square and clean.  Any debris or finish will interfere with the transfer of mechanical vibrations from the neck.  For maximum sustain, we need to take this pocket down to the bare wood.

 

This side view shows that the corners are square and clean.

 

Copper foil will be used to create the cavity shielding.  We’re starting with the hard stuff, the output jack route.

 

Bottom and sides are done.

 

All of the interior routes are lined with copper.  The seams are tacked together with solder.

 

This is the bottom side of the new pick guard, also made in Korea.  The aluminum foil must go.

 

All of the holes will be de-burred with this tool.

 

We will have a nice flat surface to which the copper foil will adhere without voids.

 

Foiling the pick guard takes just a few minutes!  Again, the seams are tacked together with solder to form a plane.

 

The foil is trimmed away from the edges with an Exacto knife.

 

This build will use these pickups.

 

This set will be a very cool foundation for this instrument.

 

The controls are mounted right to the copper.  True to Fender specs, we are using surgical tubing for pickup springs.

 

The pick guard assembly is done, complete with Orange Drop tone cap.

 

Here is another view.  All that is missing is the output jack wires and the bridge ground wire.

 

Here, the body is going together.  The output jack wiring and bridge ground wire is routed through the body and soldered to the pick guard assembly.

 

This workmanship turned out pretty.  New Old Stuff (NOS) push-back wire insulation is used to complete the vibe.

 

Everything fits!

 

The neck gets a little prep before the strings are installed.

 

Remember the Squire neck plate?  This is the replacement.

 

Meet the strings!

 

This new neck has a new nut, which needs to be slotted and filed.  String spacing is established here.

 

Here, the slots are taken to the proper depth, calculated beforehand.  The stackup of feeler gauge blades establishes the bottom of all of the string slots.  When each file touches the feeler gauge blades, we’re done.

 

The string slot depth is where we want it.  Next is to file off the top of the nut and polish it, which has been shown in other blog posts.  When this is finished, the strings will protrude just above the top of the nut.

 

Now this is beginning to look like a guitar.  This is set up as a ‘hard tail’ so no tremolo bar is needed, but one is supplied.

 

We lost Matt somewhere in the bowels of Guitar Center.

 

This message came into the Unbrokenstring Global Command Center after this guitar made it back to the rehearsal room:

“BTW been meaning to tell you, OUTSTANDING job you did with the recreation of Crow’s Fender Blackout Strat!

     “I think can say, without any hyperbole whatsoever, that just plugged straight into an amp with no tweaking whatsoever, that is the BEST SOUNDING GUITAR I HAVE EVER HEARD IN MY LIFE.

     “Completely outshines even the original Blackout he was trying to unbury.

     “We’re still absolutely dumbstruck by clarity and full tonal range of it. Truly amazing work, sir!

     “Without question, your finest creation to date.”

 

Thanks for reading all the way to the end!

CONTACT – David Latchaw EE
281-636-8626

Carvin MTS3200 Amp Head is the Victim of Hurricane Harvey

The Unbrokenstring Crew knew that it would only be a matter of time before gear submerged in Hurricane Harvey’s floods came onto the secondary market, be it CraigsList, OfferUp, or even as used gear at a national retail music chain that I will not name here, but go by the initials “Guitar Center.”.

Who could turn down this awesome piece of gear at a great used-equipment price?  But this guy blow fuses.

 

Carvin is an excellent brand.  Their musical instruments are expertly crafted, and the electronics are top drawer.  And this amp head has three channels!

 

The rear panel of this unit shows all the versatility you could possible ask for in a tube head.

 

The select-able tetrode/pentode bias switch and a ‘cabinet-voiced’ line out signal jack are cool touches.

 

Serial number, for those who are curious.

 

The tube chart is silk-screened right on the chassis.

 

But when we open the unit up and turn it over, we see rust.  Some of the tan residue is rosin solder flux, which is OK.  But at the very top of the picture is a black pit in the end of a socket pin, which has almost entirely rusted away and will require replacement.  Most electrical component leads have a core of iron, which is then tin plated for solder-ability.  If the tin is intact, water is not an issue.  But how many component leads have literally rusted away?  Has this unit been wet?

 

The reverb tank is functional, but shows signs of water exposure.

 

These springs are very hard steel, so they rust and deteriorate very quickly.

 

Confirming our wet theory, the Tolex on the bottom of the case is coming loose.

 

Did I remove those screws and not notice the rust?

 

Looking closely at the hold-down clips for the tubes, they are completely rusted.

 

The steel chassis is coated in white enamel, which is really Top Drawer.  But receding flood waters left mud.

 

Tear-down is in order to assess the condition of the unit.

 

Everything has been wet.

 

This is the component side of the circuit board that holds the power tube sockets.  All this crusty solder flux tells me that the rosin is ‘activated’ with phosphorus, a Good Thing to make good solder joints, but a Bad Thing if it gets wet.

 

The preamp tube sockets show the same reaction with the phosphorus.  This will all need to be cleaned and reworked.  Some of these leads are completely hollow as the iron core has rusted away.  It will be better to replace the sockets.

 

Electrical problems around the circuit board caused the preamp tube on the left to overheat.

A complete overhaul and rebuild of this unit would be necessary to restore functionality and reliability.  Most components should be replaced, including sockets and connectors.  However, the customer purchased this amp because it was in his price range.  The repair quotation was not in his price range.

If you are shopping for gear and see signs of water damage, such as loose Tolex, rusty hardware, or dried dirt where it shouldn’t be, you should consider having a tech go over the equipment to assess the condition and find potential reliability problems before you buy.  Rusty transformer laminations are particularly troublesome, as the rust pierces the insulating coating between laminations and allows eddy currents to flow, potentially overheating the transformer.  Transformers are expensive to replace.

Thanks for reading all the way to the end!

CONTACT – David Latchaw EE
281-636-8626

Intermittent Fender Acoustasonic 150

A fellow musician gave Charles this amp, which was nice gesture.  However, the friend said that it was intermittent.  Could the Unbrokenstring Crew turn this gesture into a reliable amp?

Styled as a unit from the Fender Brownface era, the exterior certainly checks all the boxes for Brownface goodness, with the Correct knobs and silk-screened front panel true to the archetype.  One channel is reserved for an instrument, and the other channel is tailored to vocal performance, including a dual XLR/quarter inch jack for a microphone.

 

No metal shredders allowed.  This unit has a tweeter, and an electronic gain structure that does not distort.  Just the thing for Charles’ acoustic act.  This badge still has the protective plastic in place.

 

The speaker cabinet is sealed.  This polarized connector keeps three pairs of audio signals from the amp going to the correct loudspeaker and tweeter.

 

On the back side, we find the ON/OFF switch and the IEC power socket.  Most of the rear panel is slotted for ventilation.

 

This is a solid state unit, with plenty of pep to be loud.

 

The internal architecture permits stereo operation, as is shown by the FX loop connections.  I did not play around with the USB functionality, but it’s in the manual.  We have bigger fish to fry.

 

Name, rank, and serial number, please.

 

This circuit board holds all the connectors for Line Out and effects loop functionality, as seen on the rear panel.

 

This assembly is an AC to DC power supply on the left, and an efficient Class D audio amplifier on the right.

 

Digital signal processing (DSP) is used to create the reverb and other effects.  The DSP functions are on the mezzanine board on the left.  The thin white cable in the center is the USB cable.  The main printed circuit board handles the clean audio chain and the connections to the front panel controls.  The flat cable on the right brings power from the AC to DC board and sends audio to the amplifier.

A lot of surface-mount components are found in this unit.  Those little cans are electrolytic capacitors; black squares are integrated circuits.  Each of those little black squares does the job of two vacuum tubes.  I feel old and obsolete.

 

The check mark probably means that someone tested this at the factory, I guess.

 

So the audio processing hardware is seen at the top of the picture and the power stuff is at the bottom.

 

The AC wiring comes from the switch directly to the circuit board, where there are filters and a fuse.

 

This power stuff is actually a switching power supply, which efficiently creates the various operating voltages.

 

If you look closely at the gold rings on the circuit board, you will see solder that looks ‘strange.’  It does.  Gold atoms mix into the molten tin/lead alloy while the solder joint is in the liquid state.  The gold makes the solder brittle.

 

The entire circuit board is gold plated.  This plating is among the flattest finishes available for bare circuit boards, perfect for surface mount technology (SMT) components but is a metallurgical compromise for thru-hole components..

 

As you can see, for thru-hole technology components such as these pins sticking through the board, the results of the soldering action can leave something to be desired.  Do you see the holes in the solder joints?

 

Now that those holes are fixed, we can focus on the real source of the intermittent operation.  Do you see that light blue resistor with two red stripes hiding behind the capacitor and the heat sink?

 

That light blue resistor was soldered here.  Or to be more precise, it was soldered there at one time.  The cracked solder joints became intermittent conductors.  Here I have removed the resistor and cleaned away the old solder in preparation for making a new pair of solder joints, free of gold contamination.

 

Another issue with this amp is that someone has been playing with the loudspeakers.

 

This loudspeaker fits the cabinet perfectly, but electrically, it is a 40 ohm (yes, forty ohm) loudspeaker, designed for use in a public address paging system (you know, that mess that you hear at the doctor’s office playing MUZAK, mercifully interrupted by an announcement for someone to call a telephone extension?  Yeah, that.)

 

The Correct part is available.

 

Who would have thought that you could actually replace a bad loudspeaker with a new one of the correct type?

 

Do you like those TV shows where they have a build-up to the ‘Big Reveal’?  I don’t either.

 

Fortunately, we have the correct part and are ready to install it.

 

Once we replace the grille, you will never know the difference.

 

See, I told you that you couldn’t tell the difference.  This unit plays beautiful music and the functionality is solid.

 

Support this musician, winner of a Texas Music Magazine 2018 Album of the Year:  http://www.charlesbryantmusic.com/

 

Thanks for reading all the way to the end!

CONTACT – David Latchaw EE
281-636-8626

 

Peavey MKIII Bass Head Needs Un-Smoked

This solid state Peavey Bass head is also capable of handling mixer, equalization, and preamp roles for public address, monitor, and other sound reinforcement roles.  But power amp quit!  Can the Unbrokenstring Crew help?

The AutoMix function that Peavey developed has been discussed elsewhere in the blog.  Lots of EQ knobs here!

 

Note the graphical EQ and bi-amp capability.

 

Woah!  An Instrument System!  Ooh.  Aah.

 

On the rear panel is the power switch and speaker connections.

 

Peavey mixes and matches front panels (inputs, preamp, eq) and rear panels (ps, power amp) to build different heads.

 

As is the case with many pieces of electronics, the City of Los Angeles Fire Department approves this unit!

 

Name, rank, and serial number, please.

 

The blue circuit board at the top is for connections to the power transistors.  The I/O connections are to the left and the power supply filter caps are seen here.

 

More blue boards at the top, for power transistors.  Driver transistors are found on the square heat sinks.  Do you see the problem yet?

 

This circuitry is all preamp and tone circuitry.

 

This sucker got HOT!

 

The worst damage was to components that were near the root cause.  They burned because the transistor on the aluminum heat sink suffered an internal short circuit.

 

The heat of the electrical fault was high enough to melt solder, which happens around 650 deg. F.

 

A matched set of driver transistors were installed and the circuit board cleaned.  The destroyed components to the right have been removed and will be replaced.

 

The new parts are mounted just above the circuit board.  We can get flame-proof resistors now, unlike when the unit was built with in the 1970s.

 

More collateral damage was found on one of the blue boards.  This solder trace acted as a fuse at its narrowest point.

 

The circuit board is now cleaned up and the gap is bridged with a bit of 16awg solid copper wire.

 

Some of the power transistors were shorted as well, so all of them are now replaced with a matched set of eight.

 

These parts are still made by ON Semiconductor, the heir apparent to the Motorola semiconductor product line.

 

The electronics are back together.  The filter capacitors are original, but are still in great shape, so they remain in service.

 

And, of course, after all the components and circuit boards are in flames, the fuse finally does its job.  Of course.

 

With a new fuse, the electronics are connected again and initial tests begin!

 

This unit is back on the air!  This unit is almost hifi sound quality, with endless bottom end.  Good Job Peavey!

Thanks for reading all the way to the end!

CONTACT – David Latchaw EE
281-636-8626

Peavey MX Combo Amp Rescued from a Bad Amp Tech

This combo amp had lived a hard life and had finally quit.  Grandpa wanted his grandson to get the amp fixed so that they could jam together again.  Could The Unbrokenstring Crew bring this unit back to life?
 We begin with a quick tour of the rear panel.  The ground switch is a tip of the hat to the Old Days of two wire AC.

 

 The foot switch plugs in where the REMOTE SWITCH jack is coming loose.  This gets fixed.

 

 I’m surprised that this hadn’t ripped loose.  The whole connector wil be replaced.

 

 

 Name, Rank, and Serial Number, please!

 

 What have we here?  We found grandpa’s stash.

 

Let’s get this line cord wired correctly.  Do you know what’s wrong?

 

 The black wire goes under the brass screw. “Black on brass will save you ass.”  You’re welcome.

 

 The reverb tank connects to the main circuit board with this connector.

 

 Even after all this time, the high voltage capacitors are still charged.  Woah!  This is my discharge wand at work.

 

 Our first mystery… where does this nut go?

 

 This is a fuse.  No, you think that it is a piece of 16AWG wire, but it is a fuse.  Or, it is where a fuse goes.

 

 And here, someone was tired of the fuses falling out of the holders, or what was left of the holders.

 

 The heat from the flow of current has wreaked havoc on this solder joint.

 

 This probably smelled bad when it was hot.

 

 Now that the introductions are out of the way, we need to start replacing this nonsense.

 

 These are commercial fuse holders.  These will replace all of the preceding nonsense.

 

 The plan will be to install these new fuse holders at a spot in the circuit where they will be functional, yet out of the way.

 

 The new fuse holders are held down with a screw.  This hole is where the screw goes.  Here goes!

 

 Another hole is drilled for another fuse holder.

 

 This hole is in the center of a trace.  We won’t miss that copper.  Much.

 

 Insulating nylon nuts and bolts are used to keep the new fuse holders in place.

 

The traces in the burned circuit boards are replaced with this Teflon-covered wire.

 

 Everything is now stuffed back into place.  Not too shabby, if I do say myself.

 

Turning our attention to the rear panel, your sharp eyes may recognize this connector as a MIDI female panel connector.

 

 To keep the connector hardware in one place, some of this Thread Locker is all we need.

 

 We have the original foot switch.  It needs a new cable, with a connector to match what we just installed in the amp.

 

 This MIDI cable will be repurposed to replace the cable on the footswitch assembly.

 

 We don’t need this connector.  Instead, this end of the cable will be wired to the switches themselves.

 

 The new cable is soldered directly to the switches  Note the strain relief installed to the right of the picture..

 

 This pedal is ready for action once again!

 

 The amp is reassembled and is ready to go!

 

 The four hour burn-in test is underway.  I think we have rescued another vintage Peavey amp!

Thanks for reading all the way to the end!

CONTACT – David Latchaw EE
281-636-8626

Crate Vintage Club 30 Recap

Robin had another of these wonderful Crate combo amps for servicing.  The Unbrokenstring Crew knew just what to do!

Robin’s 50 watt combo was serviced earlier, in this blog post: https://www.unbrokenstring.com/crate-vintage-club-50-amp-repair/

 

This is a 30 watt unit, with very similar construction.  Look at all that St. Louis Music goodness!

 

The loudspeaker is 100% and made in U.S.A.

 

This pic just documents where the wires go.

 

These wires go to the reverb tank.  They are marked with a magic marker so that they can be correctly re-installed.

 

The tubes need to come out as we are removing the printed circuit board from the chassis.

 

These numbers correspond to the tube numbers on the schematic.

 

While we’re here, we’ll make a check of the condition of each of the tubes.

 

Restoring the washer stack is essential to keep the strains on the printed circuit board to a minimum when reassembled.

 

So we are now able to remove the main circuit board.

 

 

As we did with the 50 watt unit, we are taking this opportunity to clean up the front panel.

 

Sure enough, the capacitors have reached End Of Life.

 

This circuit board is now recapped!  Pretty!

 

After reassembly, this quick check shows us that we can drive 30 watts continuously into eight ohms with no problem!

 

This unit has an easy bias setting arrangement.  Here, we’re using the 4 1/2 digit Fluke meter to measure current.  The AC power is supplied by the Variac on the shelf.

 

Some of the cabinet screws were cross-threaded at one time in the past.  So, we can chase them with a die.

 

The captive nuts are cleaned up with a matching tap.  We’re good for Final Assembly!

 

Another fine combo amp is ready for the next million miles!

Thanks for reading all the way to the end!

CONTACT – David Latchaw EE
281-636-8626

Peavey 260 Booster Amp Needs a Boost

A local church has a rack of Peavey gear that drives their public address system.  This unit had failed.  A phone call to The Unbrokenstring Crew was all that was needed to get this unit onto the operating table.
Unlike a traditional guitar amp or stand-alone amplifier, this unit takes high level signals and buffers it to the loudspeakers.  They are often used as a means to fill in or expand the coverage of an existing system.

 

And the inputs are daisy-chain-able.

This is, of course, the volume knob.

 

Here is a tour of the rear panel.  The power switch is ‘center-off’ and, on this unit, does not switch the chassis ground to connect to one side or the other of the AC power line.

 

No tour of a rear panel is complete without a high-rez pic of the power cord.

 

And the name/rank/serial number part of our tour.

 

The AC line fuse was popped.

 

This is, correctly, a five amp slow blow unit.

 

Removing the front and rear panels permit access to all the electronics.

 

The chassis is attached to the rear panel of the unit.  Surprisingly, the power transformer is NOT fastened to the wooden cabinet, but is also attached to the rear panel.

 

These filter capacitors are good and will not be replaced.

 

This unit has a shorted rectifier.  New parts were secured, and are shown here.  Although only one rectifier is bad, the other three are the same age and have experienced the same abuse, so they will all be replaced.

 

The new rectifiers are installed.

 

Funny thing is, the new fuse looks a whole lot like the old fuse, except it is not all exploded and burned and stuff.

 

The output from my radio is amplified to a larger signal using my Marshall Stack, to drive the input of the amp at the proper level.

 

This was the point when the neighbors called the cops to complain of the noise.

Thanks for reading all the way to the end!

CONTACT – David Latchaw EE
281-636-8626

Jasmine Classical Guitar Needs a Setup

Sophia’s classical guitar had developed a buzzing string.  Perhaps the humidity changes had changed the geometry of the instrument.  She immediately called The Unbrokenstring Crew to take a look at it!
This instrument has a truss rod, something a little out of the ordinary for classical guitars.

 

This is an Indonesian instrument, with lots of mahogany throughout.

 

Using the truss rod adjustment, we make the fret board as flat as we can get it.

 

My Super Duper Absolutely Flat sanding bar goes to work on some high frets.

 

Can you see where the metal has been removed?  This is near the tenth and eleventh frets.

 

One side of the fifth fret was particularly high.  This was the source of the original buzz.

 

The wreckage was bad over the body of the guitar, where the fret board was probably glued straight to the sound board.

 

Before we crown the frets, the fret board will be taped off.

 

To clean and condition the fret board, Dr. Duck’s Axe Wax goes to work.

 

These strings are going back on the instrument.

 

The strings are nicely tied off at the block here.

 

The stringing process is documented in earlier blog posts.  Everything is going well here!

 

Sophia performs live while standing.  So, we’ll add a strap button to the instrument lower bout here.

 

The hole for the pin clears the body of the screw.

 

This strap pin is just above the center line of the instrument. so that it will hang flat against her body.

 

This strap pin is from an inexpensive electric guitar that had strap locks installed.  It goes nicely with the binding.

 

At her favorite venue, Dunn Brothers Coffee in Friendswood TX, Sophia tunes up with an app on her phone.  Life Is Good!

Thanks for reading all the way to the end!

CONTACT – David Latchaw EE
281-636-8626

Mesa Boogie Bass 400 Repair and Refurbishment

Craig was very proud of his rack-mount tube-powered bass amp.  But there were crackles and pops while playing.  He wanted to have everything looked-at.  Could The Unbrokenstring Crew get it tuned up?
This is a heavy monster.  Yes, that implies 400 watts out.

 

These are the tubes that were still alive.  We’re missing a couple of pairs.

 

Some contact cleaner/lubricant will be applied with a pipe cleaner into each socket pin.

 

The sockets are in good shape, but just need some chemical attention.  You can still get pipe cleaners, but instead of checking the tobacco aisle, you might look at the gun cleaning supplies section of WalMart to find them.

 

The individual pins on each tube are wiped with the contact cleaner/lube before they are inserted into the unit for testing.

 

The push pull class AB1 pairs are oriented from front to back in the chassis.  Once the operating point was established, pairs of tubes were sorted that had similar characteristics.  So we matched six pairs of tubes to within 2% of each other.  Power and output transformers are seen in the foreground.

 

The amp was driven by a sine wave and operated at 60 watts into a dummy load.  Each pair of tubes were verified in sequence.

 

And this is what six pairs look like while putting 400 watts into a dummy load on a messy workbench.

 

Craig gigged with this amp.  When someone asked what he thought of his rig, he said, “It’s brutal.”

Thanks for reading all the way to the end!

CONTACT – David Latchaw EE
281-636-8626

Epiphone Dot Gets a Customized Bigsby Tremolo

Matt with My Twilight Pilot lusted for a black Epiphone Dot with a Bigsby tremolo assembly. Could the Unbrokenstring Crew rise to the occasion and make it happen?
It don’t get mo’ prettier than this!

 

The Bigsby needs a small modification, so that the tremolo bar can swing over the strings.  Here, the Bigsby is disassembled so that the modification work can begin.

 

This piece limits the swing of the arm.  So, we will carve on this to change the limits.  We don’t like limits.

 

After the carving, the metal is sanded to a uniform satin.

 

Successively finer grits remove the scratches from the previous operation.

 

This metal polish is made in Germany.  The Unbrokenstring Crew uses this stuff to polish fret wires.  Likewise, it will polish this Bigsby so that it gleams.

 

We’re just about there with the modification.  It can stand a little more carving.

 

The tailpiece is centered on the centerline of the strings, not necessarily the center seam of the lower bout.

 

When the body of the Bigsby is correctly positioned, there are two places where the metal touches the finish of the guitar.  While we are adjusting everything, some painters tape protects the finish.

 

We are committed at this point.

 

Two strings are installed to tension the Bigsby into position.  The location of the two additional screw holes are determined so that the whole assembly is straight with the neck before the holes are drilled.

 

This drill bit is in a spring loaded shell, which forces the actual bit to be in the exact center of the hole.

 

The strings are ON and now we can proceed with the setup of the Bigsby. See the small nylon washer where the spring fits?  This is an essential part of the setup.

 

String tension lowers the height of the tremolo bar.  We need to be in tune before doing much more of the setup.

 

The StroboTuner is spinning away while we tune and set the intonation of the instrument.

 

What is this?  We have a couple of screws that are having an acetone bath.  Why do you ask?

While we’re working on the guitar, these strap locks are going onto the guitar.

 

This is the half of the strap lock that goes on the strap.  Both sides are shown.

 

Those screws that were washed in acetone were painted with black lacquer, and cover up the inserts in the body where the original stop bar was held.  Pretty, isn’t she?

Thanks for reading all the way to the end!

CONTACT – David Latchaw EE
281-636-8626